i live a charmed life

needless to say, i’ve done a poor job maintaining this blog. so much life has happened since i shared here that i would be leaving my job to attend seminary full time. 

all the changes i’ve experienced have led me to do a lot of reflecting. 

i have a wonderful marriage with a wonderful person. and now we have a beautiful, healthy baby that we get to take care of. can hardly believe that we started a family together.

i live near a lot of good friends. i get to see these people all the time.

i get to go to seminary and pursue stuff i’ve always been really passionate about.

as an asian male with endorsements in special ed and english, i know that i have a decent shot at getting a job anytime i need one.

my loved ones are (generally speaking) pretty healthy. nothing scary going on these days.

all-in-all, i’m taken aback by how happy i feel. i don’t want to present a too-rosey portrait of my life, but if i’m honest with myself, things are really good, and i feel blessed and fortunate. 

procrastinators everywhere – get freedom

for mac users, there is no more important app for the sake of productivity than freedom. if you are a chronic procrastinator who spends way too much time reading blogs, checking your fantasy football team, surfing facebook, or catching up on the news while you should be doing some actual work, please do yourself a favor. download freedom. it will increase your productivity 10 fold (it definitely has for me). guaranteed.

here’s how it works. you tell freedom how long you need to work for (up to 8 hours). then, like magic, freedom disables your internet for that period of time. you’ll be banned from the world wide web. try as you may, you won’t be able to get online until the duration of your work period is over. so instead of wasting time reading twitter feeds, you’ll be left alone with your stack of work. and then, you’ll actually spend time going through the work. it’s a miracle!

come experience freedom from the tyranny of your own lazy butt =).

how he loves

the other day carrie and i were out and about running some errands and listening to the radio in the car. normally, we have it tuned to either 1) sports radio or 2) one of the local top 40 stations. but on this particular day nothing good was on, so we resorted to listening to the much-maligned spirit 105.3, seattle’s christians radio station. whenever i talk about this radio station with anyone, we invariably make fun of it for one reason or another. we are usually perplexed by how half the callers into the station speak with a southern drawl. i don’t have a problem with the music or the dj’s on spirit; i just can’t support any station that gives james dobson regular airtime. but we decided to give them a listen anyway.

then we heard this song. it’s called how he loves, and  it’s a good one. give it a listen. then check out the original by john mark mcmillan, it’s even better.

rethinking the charter school…

an interesting read from a cool education blog — here’s stanford’s credo report on the impact of charter schools on students (compared with traditional public schools). among the findings: there is a 2:1 ratio of bad charter schools to “good” charter schools.

some highlights:

The results suggest that new charter school students have an initial loss of learning in reading from charter school attendance compared to their counterparts in traditional public schools, and receive no impact in math. In subsequent years, charter school students have no significant impact in reading from charter school attendance compared to their counterparts in traditional public schools and an initial gain in math (p. 4).

The results show that in the District, Blacks enrolled in charter schools do about the same in reading and math compared to their counterparts in traditional public schools (p. 5).

Hispanics enrolled in charter schools also do about the same in reading and math compared to their counterparts in traditional public schools (p. 5).

As shown in the figure above, students in poverty enrolled in charter schools receive no significant benefit in reading or math compared to their counterparts in traditional public schools (p. 6).

Special Education students in charter schools in the District receive no significant benefit from charter school attendance compared to their counterparts in traditional public schools in either reading or math (p. 7).

English Language Learner students in charter schools in the District receive no significant benefit from charter school attendance compared to their counterparts in traditional public schools in reading or math (p. 8).

Retained students in charter schools in the District receive no significant benefit from charter school attendance compared to their counterparts in traditional public schools in reading or math (p. 9).

For students in the District, figures 8.a and 8.b show that charter schools are not creating significantly different results for students compared to their virtual peers from traditional public schools in either math or reading (p. 11).

holy moly, she can sing…

I was a little girl alone in my little world who dreamed of a little home for me. 
I played pretend between the trees, and fed my houseguests bark and leaves, and laughed in my pretty bed of green. 

I had a dream 
That I could fly from the highest swing. 
I had a dream. 

Long walks in the dark through woods grown behind the park, I asked God who I’m supposed to be. 
The stars smiled down on me, God answered in silent reverie. I said a prayer and fell asleep. 

I had a dream 
That I could fly from the highest tree. 
I had a dream. 

Now I’m old and feeling grey. I don’t know what’s left to say about this life I’m willing to leave. 
I lived it full and I lived it well, there’s many tales I’ve lived to tell. I’m ready now, I’m ready now, I’m ready now to fly from the highest wing. 

 I had a dream 

[priscilla ahn – dream]